Book Reviews

Bacon in Moscow by James Birch review – darkly funny account of art behind the iron curtain

In July 1986, James Birch, a young London gallerist with vague designs on global domination, set off for the Soviet Union. It was his first visit and he had no idea what to expect. Mikhail Gorbachev had then been general secretary of the Communist party for one year: perestroika and glasnost were in the air (or, at any rate, in the British newspapers). But still, Moscow was a world apart.
Book Reviews

At 74, He Still Has an Innate Ability to Kill

Stephen Hunter sure does love to write about guns. That’s the main takeaway from TARGETED (Emily Bestler/Atria, 364 pp., $28.99), the 12th Bob Lee Swagger novel. Earlier volumes painted more three-dimensional portraits of the supporting players surrounding Swagger, the 74-year-old former Marine sniper with a bad hip and an innate ability to kill, but this book dispenses with nuance, except in loving descriptions of specific rifles, cartridges and bullets.The plot,
Book Reviews

Book Review: Skinny House – Independent Book Review

“Book Review: Skinny House“ Reviewed by Samantha Hui A gentle reminder that history cannot be separated from the people who lived it Skinny House is a true story about an architectural oddity with good bones and inhabitants with good hearts. The book is a carefully researched historical memoir that contextualizes the construction of the Skinny House in the eras of the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression. But, more than
Book Reviews

The best recent translated fiction – review roundup

The Memory Monster by Yishai Sarid, translated by Yardenne Greenspan (Serpent’s Tail, £12.99)“This is where the illusion we call humankind was erased,” a guide to Holocaust sites tells the visitors on his tour. He is so steeped in its history that he has become corrupted by the horror, increasingly unable to see good in the world (humans are “worms with aspirations”) and even applying its grim lessons (“it’s all about
Book Reviews

Book Review: Song of Sundering – Independent Book Review

Reviewed by Alexandria Ducksworth Fantasy nerds are going to love Song of Sundering’s unique and creative world A.R. Clinton’s Song of Sundering is nowhere near your typical fantasy novel. History, war, adventure, magic, technology, mystery—this thing’s got it all. Clinton’s worldbuilding rises to the levels of J.R.R. Tolkien and Brandon Sanderson’s epic tales. You can feel the author’s creative passion seeping through its pages. The Sundering is a historical catastrophe
Book Reviews

Book Review: Big Sky Murder – Independent Book Review

Reviewed by Joelene Pynnonen An adventurous historical mystery set in Montana’s gold fields Life in Pony Gulch, Montana isn’t easy for any newcomer, but it’s an especially rocky road when you’re a bootlegging woman brewing moonshine in prohibition-era America. Delores Bailey is used to eking out a tough living in a man’s world. A disapproving community isn’t enough to run her off.  But when her only friend in town (Pete)
Book Reviews

Book Review: Never Tell Chloe – Independent Book Review

Reviewed by Kiersten Adams A paranormal thriller that explores life, death, and how we interact with those who dwell on either side of it  There are lots of stories of love, loss, and how we heal from tragedy, but none are quite like Never Tell Chloe.  The story of a young woman—in this case, Chloe—on a summer road trip is all too familiar, but the journey soon turns into one
Book Reviews

Jack and the Beanstalk review – panto season’s not yet behind you!

Scarborough’s Stephen Joseph theatre had to cancel almost half the run of its Christmas show because of coronavirus cases in the company. But, like the previous year’s The Snow Queen, they wisely filmed Jack and the Beanstalk for online audiences. Which means that, mid-January, eight-year-old Hilda and I get to see a panto together after Covid self-isolation put paid to our festive outings.Nick Lane’s adaptation, directed and choreographed by Gemma
Book Reviews

The Love Songs of WEB Du Bois by Honorée Fanonne Jeffers review – desires of the downtrodden

The author Zora Neale Hurston once joked: “I am the only negro in the United States whose grandfather on the mother’s side was not an Indian chief.” In part, Hurston was alluding to the embarrassment some African Americans felt about their “debased” African lineage, a notion that lies at the core of the poet Honorée Fanonne Jeffers’s ambitious debut novel.Epigraphic reflections on race by WEB Du Bois, a founding father
Book Reviews

What do readers think of The Almost Sisters?

Write your own review! Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews The Almost Sisters A successful career, an ailing grandmother, a one-night stand, and a Southern family with untold secrets.Leia had always been close to her grandmother, but did she really know her grandmother? After finding out her grandmother has been suffering with dementia for over 10 years, Leia puts the job she loves on hold and goes to Alabama to