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Arthur Krystal on Why Writers Lie

Your story “What’s the Deal, Hummingbird?” is a kind of tour through the life of a New Yorker in his seventies, who is reflecting on what he can remember from his past. You’re also a New Yorker in your seventies; how does this character differ from you?Photograph by Pascal Biomez / GettyTrue, we’re the same age and we both live in New York, but I’m not sure that matters much.
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Graham Swift on the “Big” and “Small” Worlds

Your story “Fireworks” is set in late October of 1962, during the Cuban missile crisis. What made you want to revisit that period?Photograph by Colin McPherson / GettyI think it was the story that made me revisit. It was that way round, as it often seems to be. The first sentences of the story, with their historical annunciation, came into my head—I can’t say why—then everything else followed. But I
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Kevin Barry Reads V. S. Pritchett

ContentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.Listen and subscribe: Apple | Spotify | Google | Wherever You ListenSign up to receive our weekly newsletter of the best New Yorker podcasts.Photograph by David Levenson / GettyKevin Barry joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “A Family Man,” by V. S. Pritchett, which was published in The New Yorker in 1977. Barry is a winner of the International
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Jennifer Egan on the Dangers of Knowing

Your story “What the Forest Remembers” has two story lines: in one, set on a day in 1965, four men experience the emerging counterculture in a California redwood forest; in the other, the daughter of one of the men uses the technology of the future to experience his memories of that day. That technology is the backbone of your forthcoming book, “The Candy House.” How did the idea of it
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Jennifer Egan Reads “What the Forest Remembers”

ContentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.Listen and subscribe: Apple | Spotify | Google | Wherever You ListenSign up to receive our weekly newsletter of the best New Yorker podcasts.Photograph by Colin McPherson / Corbis / GettyJennifer Egan reads her story “What the Forest Remembers,” from the January 3 & 10, 2022, issue of the magazine. Egan is the author of six books of fiction,
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Adam Levin Reads “A Lot of Things Have Happened”

ContentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.Listen and subscribe: Apple | Spotify | Google | Wherever You ListenSign up to receive our weekly newsletter of the best New Yorker podcasts.Photograph by Camille BordasAdam Levin reads his story “A Lot of Things Have Happened,” from the December 27, 2021, issue of the magazine. Levin is the author of the story collection “Hot Pink” and of two
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Adam Levin on Stories About Couples

In “A Lot of Things Have Happened,” your story in this week’s issue, the narrator remembers an old girlfriend through a series of events and coincidences—her fear of palmetto bugs is recalled by way of the narrator’s new house in Florida; her congratulations to him and his new wife are recalled by way of parallel stories about rodents; her sister’s death is recalled by way of an apology the narrator
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Madeleine Thien Reads “Lu, Reshaping”

ContentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.Listen and subscribe: Apple | Spotify | Google | Wherever You ListenSign up to receive our weekly newsletter of the best New Yorker podcasts.Photograph by Basso Cannarsa / AlamyMadeleine Thien reads her story “Lu, Reshaping,” from the December 20, 2021, issue of the magazine. Thien is the author of four books of fiction, including the novels “Dogs at the
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Madeleine Thien on Immigrants’ Loneliness

Your story “Lu, Reshaping” revolves around a character who has emigrated from Hong Kong to Canada and is now held back by racism in her professional life. What prompted you to write this story?Photograph by Basso Cannarsa / AlamyWhen I was growing up in Vancouver, the immigrant community around me was very entrepreneurial—running diners and takeout restaurants, small shops, import-and-export businesses, and so on. But my mother, for decades, worked
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Our Most Listened-To New Fiction of 2021

2021 in ReviewNew Yorker writers reflect on the year’s highs and lows.Few things are more comforting and reassuring than being read to. For children, it’s a form of connection, sitting beside a parent at bedtime, allowing a story to ease them into sleep. For adults, listening to fiction, letting someone else’s voice take them on a journey, can still be a way to connect—and to escape. To immerse yourself in